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 MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Tue 18 Aug 2009, 05:08

Từ ngày hôm nay mình sẽ cùng các bạn tìm hiểu mỗi ngày một từ mới, đây là những từ mình lấy ngẫu nhiên và mang tính chất cập nhật, các bạn cùng thảo luận nhé.
Mở đầu cho topic này hôm nay chúng ta cùng thảo luận về từ:

Gasconade (noun)

Pronunciation: [gas′kə nād′]

Definition: Boastful or blustering talk.

Usage 1: But to this gasconade the simple-minded have given credit--because the author showed certificates that testified to his great success, and called him "amiable and modest!" - The grammar of English grammars By Goold Brown

Usage 2: Newspapers printed almost as much gasconade and rodomontade in the 1860s as they do today. - The confederates of Chapel Hill, Texas - Stephen Chicoine

Usage 3: In fact, the as-yet-unbuilt yacht is so big, it's actually a "Gigayacht", the press release adds, with a touch of gasconade--as though the author of the release said to himself "hang on old chap, megayacht sounds a bit runty", and went one bigger. - Forbes Online - February 8, 2006 - Abramovich Speculated To Be Buyer Of Gigayacht
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Wed 19 Aug 2009, 00:09

Từ vựng hôm nay là:

Sedulous (adjective)

Pronunciation: ['se-jê-lês] (US) or British ['se-dyu-lês]

Definition: Diligent, assiduous, zealous; applying oneself unflaggingly to a task.

Usage: This is a qualitative adjective, which means it can compare, "more sedulous, most sedulous", form an adverb, "sedulously," and a noun, "sedulity" [sê-'ju-lê-tee] or [sê-'dyu-lê-tee].

Suggested Usage: Today's is another general purpose word, "If you do your homework sedulously this week, I'll take you to see the Red Sox play this weekend" is a good way for Bostonians to encourage good study habits. Use it outside the home, too: "If Ferenc were as sedulous in his work as he is in his golf, he would have dodged this last round of lay-offs."

Etymology: Latin sedulus, attentive, from sedulo, diligently, without guile from IE base se-, apart (see secede) + dolus, trickery from Greek dolos: see tale
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Thu 20 Aug 2009, 07:15

Từ vựng hôm nay là:

Divertissement (noun)

Pronunciation: [də-vûr'tĭs-mənt]

Definition: (1) A diversion; amusement; (2) A short ballet, etc. performed between the acts of a play or opera; entr'acte

Usage 1: "One reason we lasted so long is that we usually played two people who were very much in love. As we were realistic actors, we became those two people. So we had a divertissement: I had an affair with him, and he with me." - Lynn Fontanne

Usage 2: "Art is part of an ever-expanding leisure industry, geared towards entertainment and divertissement of the public, the masses, us." - Mrs. Deane

Usage 3: "These sciences were always a divertissement in the sense in which Pascal used the word; but what is their function in a society living under the motto lunam et circenses?" - Erwin Chargaff

Etymology: French: see divert.
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Fri 21 Aug 2009, 19:02

Inveigle (verb)

Pronunciation: [in-'vey-gêl]

Definition: To persuade by flattery or cajolery, to lure with clever words or trickery that blur the truth, to trick by deception.

Usage: The process of inveigling someone is inveiglement and those who engage in it are inveiglers. This word follows the second extension of the "i-before-e" rule, excepting words that sound like "Hey!" Since [e] becomes [i] before [n] and [m] in many dialects of English, you might also keep in mind that today's word begins on "in-."

Suggested Usage: Inveiglement need not rely on deception, "All his praise for the administration is part of Grimalkin's attempt to inveigle an invitation to the president's dinner table." At the same time, it does not preclude it, "Phil Anders inveigled a small fortune from Phyllis Banks by constantly dropping hints of marriage."

Etymology: Today's word started out as French aveugler "to blind" from aveugle "blind." Such exchanges of prefixes as we see here are rare but do occur: "abraid" started out as "enbraid." "Aveugle" descended from Vulgar Latin *aboculus "blind," based on ab "away from" + oculus "eye." This word is probably a loan translation, i.e. a translation of the parts of Gaulish "exsops," that is, exs "from" + ops "eye." Both the oc- in "oculus" and "ops" are results of Indo-European *okw-, also the source of English "eye," German "Augen," and Old Russian ochi "eyes" (still used in Serbian) as in the old Russian Gypsy song, Ochi chornye "Dark eyes."
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Sat 22 Aug 2009, 00:44

Persiflage (noun)

Pronunciation: ['pêr-sê-flahzh]

Definition: Light, sociable chatter or a superficial, sociable manner of speaking.

Usage: Today's word is yet another lexical orphan; no one takes "persiflate" seriously as a member of the English lexical family. It does not even have a plural.

Suggested Usage: Here is the perfect substitute for the overly colloquial term "chit-chat": "I hate to take Earnest to any social event because he is so inept at persiflage, he inevitably ends up haranguing the company with his political opinions." Are there jobs for it at work? Of course, "Seth is such a mild manager I often confuse his orders with simple persiflage." How about a quiet evening of wine and persiflage on the verandah or by a crackling fire?

Etymology: French persifler "to banter" comprising per- intensive prefix + siffler "to whistle. "Siffler" comes from Late Latin sifilare, alteration of Latin sibilare "to hiss."
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Sat 22 Aug 2009, 22:52

Bạn có thể dịch ra tiếng Việt cho mọi người cùng hiểu được không, hình như toàn từ lạ quá hì hì
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Sun 23 Aug 2009, 19:13

Em thì nghĩ la các members sẽ cùng dịch nếu có thể sẽ hay hơn, sẽ kích thích mình chịu tra từ hơn
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Tue 25 Aug 2009, 18:41

Snide (adjective)

Pronunciation: [snId]

Definition: In speaking of what someone says or writes: condescendingly malicious, sneering, 'snooty.'

Usage: Today's word has all the properties of an English word of pure-bred Germanic origin (though see Etymology), untainted by borrowing from any of our traditional sources. This being the case, the adverb "snidely" and noun "snideness" are perfectly acceptable.

Suggested Usage:
Snideness is not simple rudeness; it is a jab that suggests the utterer is in some sense superior: "I didn't like the snide comment she made about having to adjust to 'plebeian' flights to Paris since the Concorde flights were discontinued." Of course, there are many shades of superiority: "I was taken aback by his snide remark that you ride either a Harley or a motorized scooter."

Etymology: No one seems to know where today's word comes from. Stef Wates, to whom we are indebted for suggesting it, finds it hard to believe that this word is unrelated to Yiddish shnaydn (from German "schneiden") "to cut" or Dutch snijden "to cut." After all, a snide remark is a cutting remark. The problem with this theory is that today's word originally meant "false, bogus, counterfeit," as snide jewelry or snide political causes. This meaning of the word can be traced back to 1859 while the current sense is traceable only to 1933. Words, like so many other things, are not always what they seem.


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Thu 27 Aug 2009, 16:14

Pullulate (verb)

Pronunciation: ['pê-lyê-leyt]

Definition:
(1) To sprout many buds, as deciduous trees and shrubs pullulate in the spring; (2) to reproduce in numbers, to teem (with).

Usage:
No, it isn't what the coach does in the fourth quarter when you aren't performing, but a youthful word (see Etymology) expressing birth and growth. The noun is "pullulation" and the adjective is "pullulative," though the British seem to prefer "pullulant," if the Oxford English Dictionary is any indication.

Suggested Usage: Amaze your friends and make them give you strange looks by using this word, "I just love all the pullulation that comes with the first days of spring!" However, anything that buds in any sense of the word may be described by this word: "Sheila has reached that dangerous stage in her development when her opinions are just beginning to pullulate."

Etymology:
Today's word comes from the Latin verb "pullulare" (past participle, "pullulatus"), from pullulus "very young," diminutive of pullus "young, young bird." If you are thinking "pullet," you are absolutely correct—that word comes from the same Latin root. But the original root was pau- "little, few," which also occurs in Latin paucus "small, few," pauper "poor," and the name "Paul" (from "Paullus"). In English and other Germanic languages the Proto-Indo-European [p] became [f], so we are not surprised that English has a word "few."


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Sun 30 Aug 2009, 08:23

Glower (verb)

Pronunciation: ['gla-wêr]

Definition: To stare menacingly.

Usage: In the motion picture world glowering is known as "the slow burn," an expression of barely contained fury with the eyes focused on the person at fault.

Suggested Usage: Glowering always bothers people, so it is usually used defensively: "I hate it when mama glowers at me until I start my homework." "My dad doesn't speak but just glowers when I come home late." Here's another useful use: "You don't have to glower like that just because I smashed one burger in your cargo pants!"

Etymology:
Middle English gloren, possibly from Norwegian dialect glyra "to look askance." It is less likely a blend of glare + scour "search" (ME glaren + scuren).

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Mon 31 Aug 2009, 15:44

Crenate (adjective)

Pronunciation: ['kree-neyt]

Definition: Having an edge scored with indentations or scalloped, as the edge of a coin; serrate. Certain leaves and seashells are also crenate.

Usage: "Crenately" is the adverb; "crenation" is the noun. "Crenation" is used in medicine to describe the shrunken appearance of red blood cells in a hypertonic solution. 

Suggested Usage:
From a metaphorical pen with purple ink, one might see a sentence like "Denis stared at Yasmin, his forehead crenate with anger and concern." Today's word is a good one to describe a knobby or serrate(d) appearance.

Etymology: We denizens of the twenty-first century are hardly the first to make up nonce words. "Crenate" comes from Late Medieval Latin "crenatus" from crena "notch," created from a reading of an uncertain Latin word in a corrupt passage in Pliny the Elder. Today's rather obscure word shares this etymology with a much more common one: "cranny," probably borrowed from the Old French descendent of the Latin noun, "crena."


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Wed 02 Sep 2009, 11:11

Widdershins (withershins) (adverb)

Pronunciation: ['wid-êr-shinz]

Definition: Moving in a direction opposite the usual; moving counterclockwise or in the contrary direction (of the sun, especially).

Usage: Today's word is basically an adverb but may be used as an adjective without the final [s]. As a predicate adjective, however, the [s] is usually left on. D. H. Lawrence wrote in 'Plumed Serpent' (1926) "She made up her mind, to be alone, and to cut herself off from all the mechanical widdershin contacts. He, too, was widdershins, unwinding the sensations of disintegration and anti-life."

Suggested Usage: Today's word is another wonderword from the land of kilts and bagpipes that we should all fight to keep alive: "Gerard does everything widdershins; he will either turn out a grandiose success or an abrupt failure." Niches for this word abound in everyday conversations: "Remember, the prophets agree that you get nowhere walking widdershins up the escalator."

Etymology: Middle Low German weddersinnes based on wider "back," whence German wider "against" and wieder "again." The English adverb wither "wrong, perverse" is rarely used any more. The "shins" is from earlier "sinnes" and is related to Latin sentire "sense, feel" since both go back to an original root *sent- "go in or choose a direction." We borrowed "sense" from the noun of this verb. The same root also turns up in English send "to cause someone to go in a direction."

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Thu 03 Sep 2009, 08:32

Stogy (noun)

Pronunciation: ['sto-gee]

Definition: (1) A cheap cigar; (2) Far less often used to refer to rough, cheap workshoes.

Usage: A less desirable spelling is "stogie," an erroneous back derivation from the plural, "stogies." That is, it was derived by removing the plural "-s" marker but without replacing the "ie" with "y," as in "puppy: puppies," "lily : lilies," "pony : ponies."

Suggested Usage: This is a slang term, best used in jest: "No, he doesn't get the stogies he smokes at the cigar shop; I think he rolls them himself." "My neighbor from Cuba hasn't been home lately, so we'll have to smoke these stogies I got at the newsstand."

Etymology: A clipping from around 1853 of "Conestoga," the name of a town in Pennsylvania where one of the first cigar-making factories in the U. S. was built. Cigars made in Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New York were popular during the Civil War era, with those from the Pennsylvania factory being particularly well known.

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Fri 04 Sep 2009, 11:58

Anh ơi dịch hộ em sang tiếng Việt với?
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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Mon 07 Sep 2009, 17:56

Hopefully (adverb)

Pronunciation: ['hop-fêl-i]

Definition: In a manner characterized by a combination of desire and expectation.

Usage: Constructions like "Hopefully, it won't rain" are often condemned because such statements contain nothing capable of hope for the adverb to modify. But it is odd that similar constructions using "frankly," "sadly" and "mercifully" are likely to pass without comment—"hopefully" has for some reason been singled out for disapprobation. Although there is now general acceptance that such "sentence adverbs" may be used to indicate the speaker's frame of mind, you may wish to avoid them if your speech or writing is going to be critically scrutinized. The noun and verb "hope" are parents to the adjective "hopeful" and its opposite "hopeless," and their associated nouns "hopefulness" and "hopelessness."

Suggested Usage:

Test the knee-jerk pedants by using "hopefully" appropriately: "Hopefully, I'll be in the casino tonight." (You wouldn't go if you weren't hopeful.) But beware that a sentence adverb can be misinterpreted if people are the subject of your sentence: "They're to be married, hopefully, in the spring." (Do you hope for a spring wedding, or is their betrothal to be founded on nothing more than hope?)

Etymology: "Hope" seems to have simply sprung into existence as Old English "hopa, hopian." The suffix "-ful" comes from "full," a Germanic word that has undergone the usual transformation of [p] to [f] as it evolved from the Proto-Indo-European *pel. The PIE word spawned Greek polus, "much," and plethos, "many." From these we derive the prefix "poly-" which indicates an abundance, and the noun "plethora," a super-abundance. The same PIE root underlies Latin plenus, "full," from which we have English "plenitude" and "plenty."

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI   Thu 18 Feb 2010, 15:51

Tiêu đề: Re: MỖI NGÀY MỘT TỪ MỚI Thu Aug 27, 2009 4:14 pm [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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Pullulate (verb)

Pronunciation: ['pê-lyê-leyt]

Definition:
(1) To sprout many buds, as deciduous trees and shrubs pullulate in the spring; (2) to reproduce in numbers, to teem (with).

Usage:

No, it isn't what the coach does in the fourth quarter when you aren't
performing, but a youthful word (see Etymology) expressing birth and
growth. The noun is "pullulation" and the adjective is "pullulative,"
though the British seem to prefer "pullulant," if the Oxford English
Dictionary is any indication.

Suggested Usage:
Amaze your friends and make them give you strange looks by using this
word, "I just love all the pullulation that comes with the first days
of spring!" However, anything that buds in any sense of the word may be
described by this word: "Sheila has reached that dangerous stage in her
development when her opinions are just beginning to pullulate."

Etymology:

Today's word comes from the Latin verb "pullulare" (past participle,
"pullulatus"), from pullulus "very young," diminutive of pullus "young,
young bird." If you are thinking "pullet," you are absolutely
correct—that word comes from the same Latin root. But the original root
was pau- "little, few," which also occurs in Latin paucus "small, few,"
pauper "poor," and the name "Paul" (from "Paullus"). In English and
other Germanic languages the Proto-Indo-European [p] became [f], so we
are not surprised that English has a word "few."


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